Posts Tagged ‘focus’

Knitting As An Act of Passion

January 18, 2019

Recently I started to knit with a wild and fierce determination.

It could have been my passionate love for colors and my deep need for sensual touch that pointed me in the direction of soft, delicious yarns I could spend hours running over and around my skin.

It could have been the state of the world and a feeling that overcame me of needing to do something tangible that would lift spirits for more than a few minutes.

Maybe it was the budget my husband and I set for the holidays, and a deep desire to create meaningful gifts that didn’t cost a fortune, and demonstrated my love for people rather than the quick and easy obligatory shopping trip.

Perhaps it was the fact that I was detoxing from sugar, and keeping my hands busy with yarn while my mind was focused on prayer, distracting me from my usual trips to the cupboard for cookies.

And then there was the fact that my beloved little goddess doggie passed away after months of hospice, and I found it so powerfully comforting to receive a tiny crocheted bit of a prayer shawl from the Temple of Witchcraft ministry that I wanted to spread this love to others.

Maybe two decades of childrearing and keeping a house were coming to a close and I wanted somewhere to channel the grief of letting go while still feeling relevant and useful in the world.

It’s not that I was new to knitting or crocheting, sewing, or anything creative with my hands.  It was that I found myself determined to carve out a place for this in my life.  I wanted to complete projects rather than moving the basket around my house for fifteen years or so, thinking that someday I’d have time to finish that thing.

There is something so primal about knitting in a world where a machine made item can be spat out in minutes.  Primal, spiritual, and tangible.  And that translates to passion for me, because it combines the three ways in which we can align our energies in this world to truly rock our soul potential.

Whatever we doing in this world, the fires of passion will fuel our focused intention.  Seemingly small acts that are consistent will move mountains.

This passionate knitting habit looks so inconspicuous, but let me assure you, it’s a disguised sensual fire of world healing, from the inside out.

~Goddess Oceana is a Women’s Sensual Empowerment Expert, Shamanic Healer, and Goddess Oracle as well as an author and spiritual life coach.

You can find her knitting circle once a month in her healing office at Equinox Healing Arts, 85 Main St., Suite 303, Hopkinton, Ma., or leading a sacred ritual at the Goddess Circle.

 

The Spiritual Path of Business

October 12, 2013

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What do you want more of in your life?  Recently, I asked this question to a few thousand people, and the responses came pouring in.  More love, more money, more travel, and to know what one wants were the prevalent themes.  

When I originally posed this question, I was working on a program I’ve been creating and wanted to see which focus would serve the most people.  It didn’t occur to me that I had already been serving up what I serve up best, and that the people who were following me on social media were there because of what they found with me.  This single realization was an entrepreneurial epiphany on caffeine.

It’s true that an entrepreneurial venture is one of the most powerful incubators for spiritual growth.  When I first heard that statement, I didn’t get it.  Now, after years of enduring the white hot heat of entrepreneurialism, I totally get it.  Many transformations take place in honing all of the different aspects of a business, and everything in it reflect the person who’s creating it.  If one doesn’t continue to get their act together, the business will fail.  Oh yes, and only the heavy duty stick-with-it-ers win. This mix is a cauldron of personal growth and transformation.

 Giving up is not in the vocabulary of an true entrepreneur.  Changing, re-aligning, shifting ideas around, finding resources, finding information, working harder, working smarter, learning to balance, researching, delegating, laser-focused introspection, communication, team work, social skills, belief, dogged faith and determination, relentless self-inventory…these and more are all a part of creating and running a business.

What does this have to do with the question I posed?  In seeking to serve the most people and asking them how I could serve them what they truly wanted, I found out what the heart of my business was.  Years of being coached didn’t uncover this precious gem.  I’ve agonized over it, taken quiz after quiz, courses, read libraries of books, listened to videos, ad nauseum. But after all was said and done, the single most powerful step I’ve taken came out of prayer and meditation, and a deep desire to serve.

What were the steps I took?  First, I tried everything else I could think of.  When none of it offered my answer, I gave up and told Source to just give me a sign please.  Then I lived in surrender for a while.  I felt an urge to serve and put out a call in the form of a question to everyone I knew. The a~ha moment came only after I had given up my own agenda and opened my heart fully to serving others.  It’s happened before, but now I’m seeing the pattern and it has a definite flavor.

The places in my life where I have fully given myself to service, heart and soul, are the places where the richest gifts have come to me.  They’re the places where I had no expectation, and the gifts arrived like a universal, colossal Christmas of a tidal wave.  

Here are the things I’ve learned about how to run a successful business so far in no special order:

1. Show up regularly and fully.

2. Honor the concept of time.

3. See what is wanted and needed, and give that.

4. Have fun no matter what.

5. If it lights you up, it’s yours to do.

6. Put Source, God, your Higher Self, whatever you call It, first.

7. Banish negative thoughts and negative people.

8. Focus on what’s working and do more of that.

9. Live a healthy lifestyle.

10. Pour love into everything you’re doing.

11. Honor the people you serve.

12. Be willing to receive.

13. Always go the extra mile.

14. There’s no such thing as competition when the Divine is in charge.

15. Procrastination is a sign that it’s time to dance and listen to what your body needs you to know.

16. Every single thing turns out better if you pray first.

17. Love yourself.

18. Be very flexible and open.

19. Great support comes in unexpected ways if you keep your eyes open.

20. Give more of what you don’t have enough of.

 

 

Never Say Never

March 7, 2013

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When my child was five, I took him to the beach and he was so terrified that he stood at the edge of the grass and refused to walk on the sand, crying and crying.  I was beside myself, as I had hopes that swimming would be soothing for him, and enjoyable.  I made a tough decision at that time.  I decided that my child would swim no matter what, because the planet was 3/4 water and I felt it was an important skill.  Because of this commitment, I took him the next day, and the next.  He continued to stand there crying and soon it turned into rage.  I would sit about ten feet away on my towel and he would scream insults at me.  One that sticks in my head to this day was “I’m not swimming, you old handbag!!!!”  (He got that one mixed up, and I still laugh about it.)  The whole beach was staring at us.  Finally, through perseverance, I got him to the towel, and then the water.  The whole process took daily trips for weeks.  I could see the compassion in the faces of other beach-goers turn from compassion to utter dread at the sight of the mom with the screamer.

Swimming lessons was a disaster, as he stood there crying for most of it, due to the noise and commotion of having so many children around him.  The lifeguard came to speak with me.  She said that she wanted to congratulate me because she had seen parents who threw in the towel after one or two days, but never in her life had she seen a mother spend a full month acclimating her child to the beach.  She offered private lessons…and we were off and running on our journey to swim.

What was a regular class for most kids was something that was about 70% harder to navigate for my son with sensory processing disorder, or SPD.  When he was a few years old, a specialist told us something I would never forget.  She said that unfortunately, if we were to throw our child into deep water with a bunch of other kids, our child would be the one that drowned.  I stopped going to that specialist, and determined to spend my lifetime making her wrong if that was what it would take. Our first year of swimming lessons was the year that he accomplished getting wet and walking on sand and attempting to follow the instructor. Small headway, but I would take it.

The next year I tried something new.  My friend was offering for kids to come to her pool and take lessons with a teacher we paid by pooling funds.  It was a tiny bit better because the group was small and less chaotic for him, but still not optimal, and I felt sad that he just couldn’t keep up with the other kids.  Still I insisted on my swim mission.

The following year (to the best of my memory) I learned that I could get private lessons with that same teacher before the regular class, and so we signed him up for that and for the first time, he began to learn how to do some strokes.  One on one lessons, I found, was what worked best for him.  He could only stay afloat with a device, but he began to learn something.  I was elated.

Every year I did my best, and some years we couldn’t find lessons for him that he could deal with, and so my husband and I worked with him in the water ourselves, playing and encouraging him.  A few years ago, he could actually stay afloat for about six feet, swim underwater, and began to at least attempt the back float.  Other kids his age were already swimming away, but I continued to focus on whatever I could to help him only compete with himself.  He was small for his age, and so he blended in with younger children, which helped him not feel as self conscious.

Two years ago I found out about a man that I call the “Swim Whisperer”.  Jim offers classes at the local Y for homeschool kids.  I was very hopeful.  Within the first few weeks, my son was swimming better than he ever had, but still struggling for stamina and coordination.  I made another hard decision then and there to continue his lessons year round to ensure that he could maintain his stride and and improve through the winter.  Trudging through ice and storms to get to swimming was no picnic, and classes dramatically diminished that time of year.  This worked to our advantage, though,  and my son enjoyed lots of individual attention from the teacher.

Jim, the Swim Whisperer teaches like noone I have ever seen.  His patience, natural way with kids, and non-competitive classes are one of a kind.  He makes every single child the focus of a good example, and helps each of them shine.  He is magic.  I might also mention that every day swim day rolled around, my son still dreaded it.  He fought with me, didn’t want to go, and told me he hated it.  It was so hard for me to continue to drag him there when he really fought about it.  Many times I almost gave up, thinking perhaps I was fighting a losing battle, or that I was wrong to force him to learn something he didn’t care about.

My stubborn Taurus nature won out, and I held strong to my mission.  Always, I would come back to the thought that there had to be one thing this child could conquer, and that he would thank me someday because he would be able to enjoy the water, boating, summer fun…this kept me going.  Suddenly this season, my son’s swimming improved dramatically in the last year, and at almost 13 years of age, the payoff began!  My child, who was destined to drown, could now freestyle a full hundred yards, dive into the deep end and take off down the lane, and continues to improve with speed and skill.  

This whole process has taught me so much as a mother. It taught me that sometimes I have to stand for what is good for my child no matter how much he hates it.  Patience and love can get him there.  Relentless vision and commitment are as important as air when it comes to supporting a child.  It taught me that people can assume lots of things, but if I stay true to what my heart tells me is right on, miracles can happen.  I have learned subtle things about my son and how he operates, what works with him and what does not.  I learned that he says no to almost anything I suggest at first because this is the nature of SPD, that defensiveness is a first off self protection mechanism in a world that is too much for a subtle, sensitive soul.  I have learned that if I hold him with patience and love through his “no”, and allow him plenty of time to adjust without rushing, he often will melt into a “yes” after a while. 

I have learned to slow down, to completely give up comparing anyone to anyone else, but rather celebrate personal wins.  I’ve learned that well meaning people can say hurtful things without a clue as to the suffering they’ve caused.  I’ve learned to continue to plod on determinedly in the direction of my desire no matter how slow or long the journey is.  I’ve learned that when one makes up their mind with sharp focus, the universe does indeed conspire and sends us exactly what we need.  I’ve learned that if one teacher isn’t working, keep asking until you find the right one.  I’ve learned that just because something works for the majority, flexibility with individuals is best.  Most of all, I have learned to never give up and never, ever say never.

Be Free with Ecstasy

July 4, 2012

Are we really free?  We’d love to think so.   It’s easy to argue that in this world we live with a whole mess of rules and regulations, or that we’re imprisoned in circumstances that force us to stay boxed in, victimized or oppressed by others.  To some extent it could be true.  On a mundane level, we do have to follow rules and ride out the time involved in manifesting something with which we’re aligning our vibration.

We can be our own worst enemies or our own best friends.  Our minds are the culprits that convince us we are victims, often because it is far easier to blame than to act. The solution is a simple (not necessarily easy) mindset shift.  Once we realize that change is in order, we can choose to think thoughts that lift us little by little into the alignment we would prefer.

I’ve found ecstasy through the discipline of pleasure to be a sure fast track to mindset liberation.  The other day I was feeling irritated, bored, stuck, and unhappy.  The only thing left to do was to locate myself right exactly where I was (mindfulness) and focus on pleasure.  Sure enough I was suddenly feeling the air, basking in the sensations pouring into my body, and feeling blissful.

The discipline required to practice pleasure and allow ecstasy is hard.  It means we have to organize ourselves inside of time, making appointments to do something that feels good, even though we’d rather not.  It requires surrendering our vested interest in suffering and complaining.  It requires self love and commitment.

This is a picture of me on the beach, laid out flat on my back in ecstasy.  Oh yeah.

Goddess Oceana

Mindfulness Information

Womanly Art of Pleasure

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/how-dreams-become-reality.html

 


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